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August 19, 2020
eBulletin: Community Gaming Grant Review

To Operating and Project Grants Clients:

British Columbia's Community Gaming Grant Review is visiting 14 communities across the province during August and September. The Arts Office is well aware of the impact of the cuts to BC Gaming’s Direct Access Grant program on North Vancouver based arts groups and wants you know that you can express your views as part of the Review process. The last stop on the Community Gaming Review tour is Vancouver on Friday September 16, 2011, 8:30am-12:30pm, at the Renaissance Vancouver Harbourside Hotel, 1133 West Hastings Street. Pre-registration is recommended.

In July 2011, Premier Christy Clark appointed Skip Triplett, former president of Kwantlen Polytechnic University, to lead the Community Gaming Grant Review.  The Review is examining the role of government in allocating gaming revenue with input from charities, community members, industry representatives and local government.

The Community Gaming Grant Review will examine the role of government in allocating gaming revenue with input from charities, community members, industry representatives and local government. The Terms of Reference include reviewing and providing options for:

  • Existing legislation governing community gaming grant funding.
  • Funding formula.
  • Criteria/eligibility for community gaming grants.
  • Processes involved with applying for and receiving community gaming grants.
  • A multi-year funding model.
  • The future role of government in community gaming grants.

North Vancouver Perspective

In January 2010, the Arts Office reported on the impact of the 2009 cuts to BC Gaming’s Direct Access Grant program on North Vancouver based arts groups.  In 2008, over thirty groups had received in the range of $430,000 through the Direct Access Grant Program.  In 2009, only five or six groups in North Vancouver had a multi-year funding agreement with the Province and were therefore among the few, either locally or provincially, to receive a grant.  Almost all other groups were cut without consideration of the value of the programs they had provided with that grant support.  In North Vancouver, this represented a funding shortfall of more than $300,000 in provincial grant support to 25 or more arts groups.

Despite the partial re-instatement of the Direct Access Grant program, it is important to note that the level of available funding was significantly reduced, and that the focus of the program was restricted to support only those groups and activities that directly engage youth and children.  Only a few of the 25 or so groups that had been cut have been able to successfully re-apply under the new program requirements.

Please be reminded that the Community Gaming Grant Review is not an invitation to complain or rant. Rather, it's a golden opportunity to talk about the future and the significant community impact that your organization can have with the financial support derived from gaming revenues secured through an equitable and sustainable funding model.

Register Now!
Community Forums are open to the public, but seating is limited, so priority will be given to individuals who have registered.

For more information, visit the Community Gaming Grant Review website.

To register for the September 16, 2020 Community Gaming Grant Review Forum in Vancouver, click here.